Quantum Electronic Computing 2017-05-05T12:48:53+00:00

Quantum Electronic Computing

Quantum science promises an entirely new kind of information processing, in which quantum parallelism is used as a resource to greatly accelerate the computation speed.

Classical computation, the control of information in the form of electrical signals, has transformed society globally for half a century. The need for computer power continues its rapid exponential growth, but the core technology of computation, the silicon transistor, has reached its limit. Quantum science promises an entirely new kind of information processing, in which quantum parallelism is used as a resource to greatly accelerate the computation speed. The challenge for this new computing paradigm is that quantum systems are susceptible to disturbances. Much current research is devoted to the engineering of disturbance-robust quantum systems. Many groups worldwide work on the first quantum processors made from about a dozen of quantum bits (qubits), with proposals on how to scale to larger systems in the future.

Solid state qubits offer a route to scalable quantum memories and quantum information processors. Although high-fidelity operation of single- and few-qubit devices has been demonstrated, multi-qubit applications face a common technology challenge: increasing density of control signals (in space and time) while minimizing adverse effects of control noise. The overall goal of this project is the design of a scalable multi-qubit architecture that remains robust to control noise. Our solution is based on low-temperature nanosecond-timescale voltage-control techniques pioneered and used at QDev, combined with theoretical breakthroughs in the areas of topological quantum computing and quantum error correction.

Our approach is based on addressing the following challenges in parallel:

  • Interfacing quantum chips to the outside world. Assessment of signal and control integrity using multi-channel spin qubit devices.
  • Scaling within quantum chips. Demonstrate complex, re-configurable qubit networks using superconducting qubits.
  • Topological quantum information processing by exploiting particle-like states in hybrid semiconductor superconductor devices.
  • Development of a versatile quantum experiment software
  • Spin-off of new quantum and classical devices

development of cryogenic control hardware

Quantum Computing

Photonic Quantum Technology >>
Quantum Electronic Computing >>
Quantum Electronic Materials >>

All Research Team Members >>

Project Leader

Ferdinand Kuemmeth

Associate Professor, Niels Bohr Institute (NBI)

Key Investigators

Charles M. Marcus

Villum Kann Rasmussen Professor at Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) and Director of the Center for Quantum Devices and Microsoft Station Q – Copenhagen.

Karl Petersson

Assistant professor at Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute (NBI)

All Research Team Members

Ferdinand Kuemmeth
Ferdinand KuemmethProject Leader and Key Investigator, NBI
Lucas Casparis
Lucas CasparisPostdoc, NBI
Charles Marcus
Charles MarcusKey Investigator, NBI
Federico Fedele
Federico FedelePhD Student, NBI
Karl Petersson
Karl PeterssonKey Investigator, NBI
Hung Nguyen
Hung NguyenPostdoc, NBI